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Jane Engelberg Memorial Fellowship (JEMF)

The Jane Engelberg Memorial Fellowship (JEMF), established in 1991 as a highly prestigious award of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, is an ongoing tribute to Jane Engelberg, who graduated from Sarah Lawrence College in 1973 with a master's degree in human genetics. During her 15-year career as a genetic counselor, Jane developed expertise in counseling patients on issues related to hemophilia and prenatal diagnosis. In response to the special needs of Spanish-speaking clients, Jane became a bilingual genetic counselor. The human qualities of insight, compassion, and dedication will always be associated with Jane. She worked tirelessly until her death in 1988 from complications of Hodgkin's disease. 

The JEMF is funded by the Engelberg Foundation, established by Jane's husband, Alfred B. Engelberg. The Engelberg Foundation is a charitable trust that supports a wide range of activities in the fields of healthcare, science, and education. On the 25th anniversary, the Engelberg Foundation gave a $1.5 million gift to permanently endow the award and ensure the ongoing support of genetic counseling research.  

Objectives

The objectives of the JEMF are to promote the professional development of individual counselors and to improve the practice of genetic counseling by providing support for the scholarly investigation of any aspect of the profession. Such investigation is essential as the profession responds to changes in genetics, health care, and the ethical, legal, and social dimensions of genetic medicine. It is critical, therefore, that any proposed project hold the prospect of significant impact beyond the personal interests or work setting of the applicant.

The JEMF aims to fund projects that:

  • Develop innovative approaches and/or service delivery models for genetic counseling practice;
  • Improve access to genetic counseling among underserved populations;
  • Promote growth and competence in students and practicing genetic counselors;
  • Build a more diverse and inclusive workforce; and/or
  • Address an unmet need of a specific client population or populations

2021 Application Information 

Full Member Award Application

Application Deadline: May 3, 2021
Click here to download the application instructions. Click here to download the budget template.
Begin your application

Student Research Award Application

Application Deadline: June 1, 2021
Begin your application

Student Manuscript Award Application

Application Deadline: June 1, 2021
Begin your application

Please note that an NSGC account is required to complete the Full Member, Student Research, and Student Manuscript Award applications.

Application Resources

If you're interested in working with an application advisor, please contact jemf@nsgc.org to be connected with an advisor. 

Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions

What is the mission of the JEMF?

The mission of the Jane Engelberg Memorial Fellowship (JEMF) is to provide support for scholarly endeavors, enable individual professional development, and drive innovation in the field of genetic counseling.

What are the research priorities of the JEMF?

The JEMF prioritizes research that:
  • develops innovative approaches and/or service delivery models for genetic counseling practice,
  • improves access to genetic counseling among underserved populations,
  • promotes growth and competence in students and practicing genetic counselors,
  • builds a more diverse and inclusive workforce, and/or
  • addresses an unmet need of a specific client population or populations.

What awards does the JEMF offer?

The JEMF offers three different awards. Two are grants to support research (i.e. the full member research award and student thesis award), and the third is a manuscript award for publications of student thesis projects. Specific FAQs related to each award may be found within this document.

Can the JEMF Advisory Group (AG) help me determine if my idea is in scope with JEMF priorities?

The JEMF AG has a policy not comment upon the appropriateness of specific ideas prior to submission to ensure we can review all applications fairly. Our stated research priorities can be found above. We can, however, help you identify an application advisor well suited for your project. This is a person who either recently served on the JEMF Advisory Group and/or held a JEMF award in the past and is familiar with our review criteria and funding priorities.

Who is on the JEMF Nominating Committee?

The Chair of the Nominations Committee is a JEMF Advisory Group (AG) member who is rolling off. In addition, at least one member must be a prior JEMF grant recipient. Remaining members of the nominating committee must be full members of NSGC and board-certified by the ABGC. JEMF Advisory Group appoints the 5-member Nominating Committee (NC). If you are interested to serve on this Committee, please notify the JEMF Chair.

How do I apply to be on the JEMF Advisory Group (AG)?

The JEMF AG is included in the NSGC’s Call for Volunteers that occurs in the late Summer-early Fall. Candidates must be board-certified in genetic counseling and members of NSGC in good standing. Interested ABGC-certified individuals submit a CV and completed application.

Full Member Award

Where can I access instructions for the JEMF full member award?

Application instructions can be accessed here.

How do I submit the application?

Applications should be submitted via the online portal, and also by emailing a single PDF to jemf@nsgc.org.

What types of research is the JEMF looking for?

The JEMF prioritizes research that:
  • develops innovative approaches and/or service delivery models for genetic counseling practice,
  • improves access to genetic counseling among underserved populations,
  • promotes growth and competence in students and practicing genetic counselors,
  • builds a more diverse and inclusive workforce, and/or
  • addresses an unmet need of a specific client population or populations

Can I submit a proposal with someone else as a co-PI?

It is permissible, and common among past awardees, to have a co-PI. There are many advantages to having more than one PI. It can provide a complementary skill set, dilute the workload, enable mentorship when one PI is less experienced, and/or make the project more fun and/or less intimidating. All PI’s must be full members of NSGC. (Co-investigators and other roles are not required to be NSGC full members.) If you encounter workplace restrictions, please reach out to the JEMF AG.

Are organizations eligible for the JEMF award, or only individuals?

Only individuals who are NSGC full members in good standing are eligible for the JEMF Full Member Award. There is no restriction on the type of organization the member is employed by. Although it is an individual who is funded, that individual is funded through her/his institution.

Is it possible for me to request a JEMF Advisory Group (AG) member to serve as collaborator or key personnel on the project?

In an effort to significantly decrease the potential for conflicts of interest, JEMF has a policy that current AG members may not serve as collaborators or key personnel on JEMF applications initiated during their tenure on the AG and for one year after their term ends.

What resources are available to help me with my JEMF application?

JEMF offered a webinar titled, Developing a Successful JEMF Application, that was recorded and available to view at (248) Developing a Successful JEMF Application - YouTube The JEMF AG can also help you identify an application advisor – someone who has recently served on the JEMF Advisory Group and/or has held a JEMF award in the past and is familiar with our review criteria and funding priorities. To ensure we can review all applications fairly, as a policy the current JEMF AG does not advise on JEMF projects or applications.

Do I need to have an application advisor and a mentor? What is the difference?

Application advisors, who assist with the application submission, are those who have recently served on the JEMF Advisory Group and/or have held a JEMF award in the past and who are familiar with our review criteria and funding priorities. Project mentors are content experts who provide support to PI(s) on projects during the funding period. All applicants should identify an application advisor to assist with application and a project mentor(s) for the study period. In some cases, the same person may fill both roles. We encourage you to learn more about these roles by accessing our recorded webinar here or slide deck here. The JEMF Advisory Group can help make these connections, or the applicant can identify an Application Advisor. To ensure we can review all applications fairly, as a policy the current JEMF AG does not advise on JEMF projects or applications.

How many full member applications are typically submitted each year?

The number of applications varies from year to year. We typically receive 10 or fewer.

How many years is funding for?

The JEMF award supports projects for two years.

Should the grant application be submitted through our sponsored grant office, development office, or by the individual only?

The award typically goes through sponsored grants offices.

Will the funds be sent to the individual or to the organization that the member is employed by?

The grant funds are awarded through the institution, not directly to the individual.

I only have limited research experience. How will this impact my chances of being chosen?

We encourage young investigators to apply. The most important thing is to demonstrate the ability to execute the project. Can you demonstrate enough experience to be successful in what you propose? If not, have you included a mentor, co-PI, co-I, and/or consultant on your project to compensate for any shortcomings in knowledge/experience you have to assist with successful execution?

I have never been awarded a grant before. How will this impact my chances?

Many well published and/or research genetic counselors have never obtained their own grant for a variety of reasons. This in and of itself will not hurt your chances as long as you have demonstrated sufficient experience to execute and/or have included a mentor, co-PI, co-I, or consultant on your project to compensate for any shortcomings in knowledge/experience to execute.

My JEMF proposal was not chosen. How do I determine if I should apply again?

We encourage applicants to reach out to a member of the JEMF AG to discuss this. Many awardees were funded on subsequent attempts. Below are some of the many reasons a project may not have been chosen. In some instances, it is a combination of factors. Many of these can be addressed to increase the strength of a proposal for resubmission. A mentor may be able to help you determine whether to submit again and/or be able to assist you with your grant proposal.
  • The proposal was well written and highly rated, but another high-caliber project was chosen instead – either because it was slightly more well received, addressed a timelier need for the profession, better met the purpose of the award, etc.
  • The grant content itself was insufficient to fully evaluate the project and/or the PI’s ability to execute. Some examples include:
    • PI(s) did not properly follow one or more instructions
    • the research question was not clear
    • the methods weren’t detailed and/or clear enough
    • experience/training of the PI was not described fully enough
    • strategies to compensate for gaps in expertise of the PI were not addressed
    • impact on awardee(s) professional growth was not well articulated and/or compelling
  • The project was too ambitious for the money and/or time available for this award
  • The project itself needs some fine tuning to be successful. Some examples include:
    • the methods chosen may not have been appropriate
    • other methods would be more appropriate
    • the research question was not fully flushed out
  • The investigator does not have sufficient experience in a skill and did not include a mentor/expert in the application.
  • The project may not have reflected the purpose of this particular award.

How many times can I resubmit an application?

You may resubmit two times after the original submission.

How are conflicts of interests between JEMF applicants and Advisory Group (AG) members managed? Does this limit the ability to apply?

A conflict of interest (COI) with an AG member does not prohibit a candidate from applying. AG members with a COI are not permitted to contribute to the decision process regarding that award. Examples of potential conflicts of interest include, but are not limited to AG members who:
  • work at the same institution as the applicant,
  • have a financial relationship with the applicant (e.g. contract with),
  • collaborated on a research project or paper completed in the past four years,
  • worked in a supervisory capacity with the applicant in the past four years, and
  • has other personal relationship that the AG member feels raises a conflict of interest.

When will I be notified of the award decision?

The JEMF Advisory Group (AG) typically makes an award decision in the summer during their annual meeting. Applicants are informed of the results after this meeting, but prior to the NSGC Conference. The date varies each year depending on the date of the AG meeting.

What is required of me if I receive a JEMF Full Member Award?

Awardees must submit quarterly progress reports, present findings at the NSGC conference, acknowledge JEMF in all presentations and publications, and return unused funds to JEMF.

How do I return my remaining funds left over at the completion of my project to JEMF?

Make check payable to “The National Society of Genetic Counselors,” and send to 8359 Solutions Center, Chicago, IL 60677 with a note in the memo to indicate return of JEMF funds.

How do I acknowledge JEMF in my publications and presentations?

Awardees should acknowledge JEMF as follows: "This work has been supported by the Jane Engelberg Memorial Fellowship, the 20** grant from the Engelberg Foundation to the National Society of Genetic Counselors, Inc."

Student Research Award

I am interested in applying for the JEMF student research award this year. Are there specific guidelines for submitting a research proposal and budget?

For complete information on the award, please view the information above.

Who is eligible for a JEMF student award?

All applicants must be a genetic counseling student currently enrolled in an ACGC-accredited genetic counseling training program at the time of submission and for the duration of use (i.e. funds cannot be used after graduation and must be returned). Students are not required to be members of NSGC.

How much is the award for?

The amount of the award is up to $500. Financial need for the project can be greater, but amount requested cannot exceed $500. If JEMF funds will not be sufficient, please articulate how the funding gap will be addressed.

Can students without an NSGC membership apply for the JEMF Student Award?

Students are not required to be an NSGC member but must use an NSGC guest account to access the application. To create an NSGC guest account, click here. Once you are signed into your guest account, you will be able to complete the application.

How do I submit the application?

Submit application through an online application - available here. Select the “Go” button. This will lead to the application, which includes more information on the application process and requirements. Because the application is submitted through an NSGC online portal, the site requires a login – either guest or paid membership. To create an NSGC guest account, click here. Once you are signed into your guest account, you will be able to complete the application.

Can students apply for the JEMF Student Award using the application form in Microsoft word document from prior years?

Please complete the most recent version of the form on our website.

Is it possible to access an example of a student proposal?

You can access an example of a proposal here.

How many student applications are typically submitted each year?

This varies from year to year. We typically receive 30 or fewer.

I am hoping to apply for the JEMF Student Research Award but am unable to access the linebudget item table example. Could please clarify what this document entails or provide details on how to format this file?

Please include a table listing each expense with the following column headers: Service, Cost of Service, Total, and Anticipated Funding. You may also email jemf@nsgc.org to view the example in a format other than the one provided within the application.

Can I request funds from more than one grant source if the JEMF Student Award amount is insufficient?

Financial need for project can be greater than the JEMF award amount, but amount requested from JEMF cannot exceed $500. If JEMF funds will not be sufficient, applicants may seek other sources to make up the shortfall. Please articulate how this will be done in your submission.

How long do I have to use the JEMF funds?

Funds can be used until the project is complete or until graduation, whichever comes first. Un-used funds must be returned to JEMF.

When and how will I be notified about the award decision?

The JEMF Advisory Group typically makes an award decision during their annual meeting in early summer. The JEMF Chair notifies all applicants and their program directors by email. A follow-up letter is sent to chosen awardees that includes a Progress/Final Report Form.

Can I resubmit a JEMF application for the same project if I am not funded?

Resubmission of a student application is not permitted.

What is required of me if I receive a JEMF Student Award?

Student awardees are expected to submit a Progress/Final Report Form by June 1 in the year following their award. The form requests information about outcomes of their funded project (conference abstracts, manuscripts) and for an accounting of their expenses. An abstract of their study is required. These reports will be reviewed by the JEMF Advisory Group at the annual business meeting. Any unused funds are expected to be returned to JEMF.

How do I receive funds and return remaining funds at the completion of the project?

Funds will be disbursed as a one-time check made payable directly to the student awardees for the amount requested, typically within a month of selection. For tax purposes, awardees are asked to account for the funding in their report. To return remaining funds, make check payable to “The National Society of Genetic Counselors,” and send to 8359 Solutions Center, Chicago, IL 60677 with a note in the memo to indicate return of JEMF student award funds.

How do I acknowledge JEMF in my publications and presentations?

The acknowledgment for the Student Research award must be worded as follows: "This work has been supported by the Jane Engelberg Memorial Fellowship Student Research Award, provided by the Engelberg Foundation to the National Society of Genetic Counselors, Inc."

Student Manuscript Award

Who is eligible for the JEMF Student Manuscript Award?

To be eligible for this award, an individual must be an NSGC member in good standing who previously applied for a JEMF Student Award. The manuscript should be a publication of their thesis findings. Of note, all applicants of the JEMF Student Award are eligible to apply, regardless of whether they were awarded funds by JEMF. The manuscript must be within 5 years of the author’s application for a JEMF Student Research Award.

My program director is on the JEMF Advisory Group (AG). Will they be able to contribute to the decision process regarding my application?

JEMF AG members who have a conflict of interest for any JEMF award submission are not permitted to contribute to the decision process regarding that award. As such, your program director on the AG would not be able to contribute to the decision process.

Can I resubmit a JEMF application for a manuscript award?

Applications for the manuscript award may be resubmitted if the applicant is still eligible to win the award (e.g. within the 5-year time frame post-JEMF Student Research Award application.)

How are funds received, and how do I return any remaining funds left over at the completion of my project to JEMF?

Funds will be disbursed as a one-time check made payable directly to the author awardees, typically within a month of selecting the awarded proposals.

Advisory Group

Current Members

  • Erin Linnenbringer, PhD MS CGC, Chair (2017-2021)
  • Sarah Kalia, ScM CGC, Immediate Past Chair (2017-2021)
  • John Quillin, PhD MPH MS CGC, Chair-Elect (2018-2022)
  • Flavia Facio, MS, Finance Chair (2019 - 2023)
  • Susan Estabrooks Hahn, MS CGC (2019 - 2023)
  • Leila Jamal, ScM PhD CGC, Secretary (2020 - 2024)
  • Sara Fitzgerald Butt, MS CGC, Information Officer (2020-2024)
  • Sharon Aufox, MS, CGC (2021-2025)
  • Adam Buchanan, MS, MPH, LCGC (2021-2025)
  • Yue Guan, ScM, PhD, CGC (2021-2025)

Past Members

  • Audrey Heimler, MS, Founding Board, Chair 1991-1999, Executive Chair, 2000-2002
  • Ed Kloza, MS (1991-1993)
  • Karen Greendale, MA (1991-1994)
  • Judith Benkendorf, MS (1991-1995)
  • Barbara Bowles Biesecker, MS (1991-1996)
  • Barbara Bernhardt, MS (1993-1997)
  • Joseph McInerney, MS (1994-1998)
  • Bonnie Jeanne Baty, MS (1995-1999)
  • Katherine A. Schneider, MPH (1996-2000)
  • Robin L. Bennett (1997-2002, Chair 1999-2001)
  • Joan Scott (1998-2000)
  • Ann C.M. Smith, MA, DSc (hon) (1999-2004)
  • Melissa Lenihan, MS (2003 - 2004) (NSGC Liaison)
  • Andrew W. Faucett, MS (2000-2005, Chair 2002-2004)
  • Wendy Uhlmann, MS (2001-2006, Secretary 2001-2003)
  • Emily Burkett, MS (2005-2006) (NSGC Liaison)
  • Elizabeth Gettig, MS (2001-2007, Chair 2005-2007)
  • Kathy Valverde, MS (2002-2008)
  • Steve Keiles (2007-2008) (NSGC Liaison)
  • Michelle Fox, MS (2003-2009)
  • Toni Pollin, PhD (2005-2009)
  • Jill Stopfer, MS (2006-2011)
  • Caroline Lieber, MS, NSGC Board Liaison (2009 - 2011)
  • Christina Palmer, PhD, Chair (2007-2012)
  • Kevin Sweet, MS, Chair (2008-2013)
  • Laura Conway, PhD, MS, Chair (2009-2014)
  • Jehannine Austin, PhD, Secretary (2009-2014)
  • Kelly Ormond, MS, Chair (2010-2015)
  • Don Hadley, MS (2010-2014)
  • Amy Cronister, NSGC Board Liaison (2012-2014)
  • Leslie Evans, MS CGC (2011-2016)
  • Maureen Smith, MS CGC (2011-2016)
  • Daniel Riconda,  NSGC Board Liaison (2015-2016)
  • Melanie Myers, Chair, PhD MS LGC (2012-2017) 
  • Dawn Allain, Chair (2014 - 2018)
  • Lauren Morgenroth, MS CGC (2014-2019)  
  • Gillian Hooker, MS CGC Secretary (2015-2019)
  • Beverly Yashar, PhD MS CGC (2015-2020) 

 

Previous JEMF Full Member Project Recipients

Information on previous JEMF awardees and JEMF funded projects is available here

Previous JEMF Student Member Project Recipients

Information on previous JEMF student awardees projects is available here.

 

2020

Student Research Award

  • Megan Pope, Understanding Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patient's Decision-Making to Pursue Genetic Counseling and/or Testing
  • Nicole Huser, Amplifying Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Voices in Genetic Counseling Gender-Affirming Care Education
  • Farid Barquet Ramos, Exploring the opportunities and challenges of utilizing a telehealth model for the remote clinical supervision of genetic counseling students
  • Nicole Si Yan Lang, Next Generation Sequencing-based Newborn Screening: Parental Preferences for Identifiable Target Conditions
  • Courtney Cook, Parents’ perspectives, experiences and need for support when communicating with their children about the psychiatric manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS)

Student Manuscript Award

  • Sarah Mazzola, Primary care physicians' understanding and utilization of pediatric exome sequencing results 

2019

Student Research Award

  • Yi Liu, An interpretative phenomenological analysis: the lived experience of emerging adults at-risk for gastric cancer due to a CDH1 variant in medical management decision-making 
  • Joseph Liu, Impact of ancestry-related test limitations on informed consent for clinical genetic testing
  • Kathryn Reyes, Characterizing Uncertainty in Carriers of a Pathogenic Variant in ATM
  • Elise Sobotka, Accessing Genetic Counseling:  The Experiences of Patients Identified by a Hereditary Cancer Screening Program
  • Elysa Bond, Disclosure of genetic risk to dating partners among young adults with von Hippel-Lindau disease: When do you share?

Student Manuscript Award

  • Kennedy Borle, Risk communication in genetic counseling: Exploring uptake and perception of recurrence numbers, and their impact on patient outcomes

2018

Student Research Award

  • Amber Aeilts, Reactions to Receiving Unsolicited Genetics Information from a Relative via Infographic Video
  • Brighton Goodhue, Effect of Carrier Screening Educational Video on Knowledge and Intent in an OB/GYN Population 
  • Lauren Seemann, Assessing Need and Utility of a Machine Learning Algorithm for Pedigree Analysis 
  • Melissa Henderson, Factors that impact medical management decisions among women with pathogenic variants in moderate-risk genes associated with hereditary breast cancer
  • Simina Bogatan, Assessing the Utility of an Interactive Educational Module in Facilitating Discussion of 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome between Parents and their Children 

Student Manuscript Award

  • Diane Koeller, Utilization of Genetic Counseling after Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing: Findings from the Impact of Personal Genomics (PGen) Study

2017

Student Research Award

  • Lauren Turner, An evaluation of patient decision making and needs following a positive NIPT result
  • Natalie Waligorski, Accessibility of Prenatal Genetic Counseling Services Among Incarcerated Women
  • Stephanie Wiryaman, Assessing family-based perceptions of the disorders of sex development (DSD) nomenclature
  • Cheyenne Dewey, What Walls? Demystifying the Role of Race/Ethnicity in Genetic Counseling Supervisory Relationships
  • Matthew Osmond, Exploring the return of raw clinical exome data in North America
  • Megha Ranganathan, The Relationship Between Age-of-Onset and the Phenotypic Manifestations in Adult Onset Huntington’s Disease
  • Kestutis Micke, Text messaging as an intervention: Improving mental health outcomes in parents with a newborn that has a congenital heart defect
  • Stephanie Booke, Genetic counselors’ attitudes towards and practice related to psychiatric illness
  • Kennedy Borle, Exploring the provision of recurrence numbers in psychiatric genetic counseling: focus on impact on patient outcomes
  • Jessica Isaacs, Potential Methods to Strengthen the Counselor-Patient Alliance in a Genetic Counseling Session: Nonconscious Priming and Empathetic Phrasing

Student Manuscript Award

  • Carol Ko, Genetic Testing Impacts the Utility of Prospective Familial Screening in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Through Identification of a Non-Familial Subgroup

2016

Student Research Award

  • Kelly Morgan, Pilot Evaluation of a Hybrid Pre-Test Cancer Genetic Counseling Model: Video + Counseling Model Versus Counseling Only Model 
  • Ayaka Suzuki, Familial Communication of Positive BRCA1/2 Results: A Relational Dialectics Theory Approach 
  • Evan Hathaway, Gambling and medical decisions: The influence of risk propensity on choices related to genetically-predisposed health conditions
  • Beatrix Wong, Personality traits and perfectionism in genetic counselors at risk for compassion fatigue
  • Julianne Whitleigh, Do cultural or language barriers exist in the delivery of the diagnosis of Down syndrome? A study comparing the diagnosis experience of English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children with Down syndrome
  • Sarah Caldwell, Genetic Counseling Student Self-Efficacy and the Supervisory Working Alliance

Student Manuscript Award

  • Ping Gong, Impact of HD Gene-Positive Status on Pre-Symptomatic Young Adults and Recommendations for Genetic Counselors

 

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